What are some strategies the FDA has implemented, which help prevent medication errors in the pharmacy?

by Whitney
(Nevada)

Error Prevention Strategies from the FDA that Produce RESULTS?

Error Prevention Strategies from the FDA that Produce RESULTS?

It seems like some of the errors that have been recently made by our pharmacy techs are actually really preventable.

Does the FDA do anything about reports it receives on medication errors? What is the role of the FDA in helping to prevent med errors? What types of things, on a regulatory level, does the FDA do to prevent mistakes at the pharmacy level?

It would be good for the many other visitors that come here to this site to know this as well. Thanks in advance!

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Answer of what the FDA does, on a Regulatory level for Pharmacies
by: David

Whitney,
Most all errors that happen in pharmacies ARE preventable. It is important to know, that not only technicians make mistakes and are human, but pharmacists, physician assistants, medical doctors, nurses and other medical providers and support staff... ALL make mistakes and are human. No one is above making a mistake.

The FDA website lists some strategies they have in place, on a regulatory level, to help in the reduction of medical and PHARMACY mistakes and errors.

https://www.fda.gov/drugs/resourcesforyou/consumers/ucm143553.htm

The above link lists some of the following strategies:

-For Hospitals and Pharmacies, there is a rule about the scanning of Label Bar Codes before prescriptions are released to the patient.

-The confusion around (LOOK ALIKE/SOUND ALIKE) Medication Names: The FDA receives reports of pharmacy errors related to drug names that cause confusion, gets the word out to pharmacies to be careful, and provides their (the FDAs) recommendations on how to prevent mistakes in the future.

-Labeling on OTC medications and the potential for medication misuse: In 2002, in the month of May, a regulation from the FDA became effective that requires "Drug Facts" on OTC labels. This encompasses over a hundred thousand over-the-counter products. This standardization of labeling assists consumers in their selection and comparison of OTC items and their understanding of the instructions on how the products are to be effectively used.

-The Education of the Public and the Tracking of Med Errors: Drug manufacturers report med errors to the FDA and the FDA reviews these documents. Also, the FDA has a reporting system for adverse events, called MedWatch. These MedWatch reports are also reviewed. In addition, reports are received from the USP (United States Pharmacopeia) and the ISMP (Institute for Safe Medication Practices) related to errors at any step in the process from a pharmacy receiving a prescription to the patient or nurse administering the medication.

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Answer of what the FDA does, on a Regulatory level for Pharmacies
by: David

Whitney,
Most all errors that happen in pharmacies ARE preventable. It is important to know, that not only technicians make mistakes and are human, but pharmacists, physician assistants, medical doctors, nurses and other medical providers and support staff... ALL make mistakes and are human. No one is above making a mistake.

The FDA website lists some strategies they have in place, on a regulatory level, to help in the reduction of medical and PHARMACY mistakes and errors.

https://www.fda.gov/drugs/resourcesforyou/consumers/ucm143553.htm

The above link lists some of the following strategies:

-For Hospitals and Pharmacies, there is a rule about the scanning of Label Bar Codes before prescriptions are released to the patient.

-The confusion around (LOOK ALIKE/SOUND ALIKE) Medication Names: The FDA receives reports of pharmacy errors related to drug names that cause confusion, gets the word out to pharmacies to be careful, and provides their (the FDAs) recommendations on how to prevent mistakes in the future.

-Labeling on OTC medications and the potential for medication misuse: In 2002, in the month of May, a regulation from the FDA became effective that requires "Drug Facts" on OTC labels. This encompasses over a hundred thousand over-the-counter products. This standardization of labeling assists consumers in their selection and comparison of OTC items and their understanding of the instructions on how the products are to be effectively used.

-The Education of the Public and the Tracking of Med Errors: Drug manufacturers report med errors to the FDA and the FDA reviews these documents. Also, the FDA has a reporting system for adverse events, called MedWatch. These MedWatch reports are also reviewed. In addition, reports are received from the USP (United States Pharmacopeia) and the ISMP (Institute for Safe Medication Practices) related to errors at any step in the process from a pharmacy receiving a prescription to the patient or nurse administering the medication.

Rating
starstarstarstarstar

by: David

Whitney,
Most all errors that happen in pharmacies ARE preventable. It is important to know, that not only technicians make mistakes and are human, but pharmacists, physician assistants, medical doctors, nurses and other medical providers and support staff... ALL make mistakes and are human. No one is above making a mistake.

The FDA website lists some strategies they have in place, on a regulatory level, to help in the reduction of medical and PHARMACY mistakes and errors.

https://www.fda.gov/drugs/resourcesforyou/consumers/ucm143553.htm

The above link lists some of the following strategies:

-For Hospitals and Pharmacies, there is a rule about the scanning of Label Bar Codes before prescriptions are released to the patient.

-The confusion around (LOOK ALIKE/SOUND ALIKE) Medication Names: The FDA receives reports of pharmacy errors related to drug names that cause confusion, gets the word out to pharmacies to be careful, and provides their (the FDAs) recommendations on how to prevent mistakes in the future.

-Labeling on OTC medications and the potential for medication misuse: In 2002, in the month of May, a regulation from the FDA became effective that requires "Drug Facts" on OTC labels. This encompasses over a hundred thousand over-the-counter products. This standardization of labeling assists consumers in their selection and comparison of OTC items and their understanding of the instructions on how the products are to be effectively used.

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